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Sat Aug 26, 2006 3:19 pm

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Master Masters Athlete
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Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 2:06 pm
Posts: 192
Location: San Diego

Track is track, some say. Oldsters can train like kids -- just with fewer, slower, lighter reps.

Yeah, right.

Through trial, error and injury, masters athletes have learned how to tweak their old workouts without tweaking their hammies. We've also discovered how NOT to train.

Here is where you come in. Share your expertise! What workouts work for you?

Please specify your age group and event. My hope is that this message board will be a great reference for novice and elite masters alike.

What's YOUR training secrets? Do tell.

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Ken Stone
http://www.masterstrack.com



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Sat Aug 26, 2006 6:29 pm

 
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Junior Masters Athlete
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 6:27 pm
Posts: 3

M55 Jumps. My 'secret' is to coach HS track and jump with them every day. Beats 'real' training!



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Thu Sep 07, 2006 11:19 am

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Junior Masters Athlete
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 11:02 am
Posts: 3
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan

I started masters competition 4 seasons ago so I am still learning my limits. I especially train with weights during the offseason . I do bench press, modified 1/2 back squats to avoid knee strain, roman chair sit-ups, russian twists,and back lifts. The frequency is usually averages 2-3 times per week with the intensity entirely depending on how I feel that day. The reps are generally low for bench and squat (5 or less) while the roman chair is more like 8 reps. During the active throwing season I cut back to maintain and stop doing squats in order to preserve the knees.

Easy throwing as we come out of winter (Michigan), but once in shape, so far, I can only throw once per week hard. It takes my muscles and knees that long to recover from throwing hard. I would like to throw twice per week for technique. I have arthritis in the feet so I can't run/jog as an endurance supplement so I may have to use a stationary bicycle. One thing I could do that would help my speed is to reduce body fat. My best mark to date is 140' 9".

It would be good to know how people work around various maladies.



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Thu Sep 07, 2006 5:02 pm

 
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Master Masters Athlete
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 4:56 pm
Posts: 105
Location: Houston, Tx

I don't know Toby, it sounds like you might be over-the -hill and ready to "hang it up". (Just kidding.)

I don't know if you remember me, but I took third place to you and Tino Martinez at the Huntsman Games in 2004. Your wife had just gotten a new camera and she posed us for a pic after the meet.

Congratulations on the 140'9". I'm hoping to join the 140' club soon. All I need is a decent wind for a change.

Sorry to hear that you can only throw once a week. I may be well on my way to that because I've recently messed up my shoulder. We'll see...I get the results of an MRI tomorrow afternoon.

It's good to see you're still throwing.

John Stilbert (M50)



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Thu Sep 07, 2006 7:53 pm

 
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Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 2:06 pm
Posts: 192
Location: San Diego

Good notes, guys.

But to help keep things organized, let's start a new thread for every new event or technique.

You know the drill: Just click NEW TOPIC, type something in the headline window, and supply some age-old advice in the message window.

The world is waiting for your wisdom!

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Ken Stone
http://www.masterstrack.com



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Thu Sep 07, 2006 7:58 pm

 
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Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:01 pm
Posts: 250
Location: Chico, CA

Technique becomes more important as we age. As the great discus thrower John Powell says, "Good technique doesn't hurt." As a young thrower, I got as strong as possible, landed in position, and blasted it. That method is unrealistic for older throwers, yet that's how most of us throw.

Video is extremely valuable. Download technique films from web or buy them from USA Track and Field. Compare your technique with the elite athletes. Try to incorporate as much of their technique as you can. It is more realistic to gain 10 feet from improved technique than by trying to gain 100 pounds in your bench press or squat.

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Thomas Fahey
Dept Kinesiology
California State University, Chico
Chico, CA 95929-0330
discusdoc@aol.com



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Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:50 pm

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Junior Masters Athlete
Joined: Sat Sep 09, 2006 3:49 am
Posts: 3
Location: Fresno,ca

Training gives me self-expression. A way of finding out who I am and others are. Training introduces risk, and takes me beyond the 9 to 5 day into a sense of tranquility and harmony. Now that I have reached the Masters level training is more peace of mind.



joe :idea:

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Tue Oct 03, 2006 9:01 am

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Junior Masters Athlete
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2006 8:49 am
Posts: 3
Location: Wash D.C Metro area

I have just completed my 4th season as a masters sprinter (100m and 200M) in the 50-54 age group. I found that you can learn quickly by communicating with experienced fellow athletes. Get to know what your physical stimulations and limitations are. Listen to those who have been where you are trying to go and use what you feel with help your situation and consider the rest. Train hard but not to hard (If you're gonna suffer an injury, you would prefer it in competition; not training). As we get older, we need recovery time from a good workout. This is why I sprint one day then work on strength the next day without weights (sit-ups, push-ups, squats, heel-raises, lunges) to allow the minor muscle tears (from sprinting) time to mend.

http://home.usadatanet.net/opeyton

Oscar Peyton



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Sat Jul 14, 2007 8:51 pm

 
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Junior Masters Athlete
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 9:05 pm
Posts: 5

Wow,

I just read the posts and they are great. I have to fully agree and endorse PatC that coaching and training with high school athletes every day (for the few months the weather permits) is the very best way to train. It has been for me, as I jump, run and throw in the 55 to 59 (soon in the 60s). Just hearing things like, " that's insane" or " you're not made of the same stuff we are" when you throw 50 meters with the 1 kg discus has to be a morale booster you can't find anywhere else.

Under-coaching the kids is always my favorite. Warming up gently and throwing before they get there has been better for me. My favorite is standing in the field and throwing back to the cage (you get good at it) and encouraging throwers to get out of their comfort zone. Hitting the cage means to me that you are trying harder than your comfort zone and is expected. All manner of throwing is allowed and experimenting with lower (against the wind) and higher than you think is also allowed. Learning by doing so that you body learns. Once your body learns, we work on throwing relaxed and getting your head out of the way (by asking your mind to let the body do what it knows how to do). What amazes them is finally getting off a perfect shot and realizing how easy it really was and thinking that had they known it was that smooth and easy they would have tried harder.

All the little things we seem to forget when we ourselves practice, somehow show up in practice and reminds us of techniques and neural patterns we need to revisit.

Throwing discus and shot has become like meditation for me. Two wonderful hours can go bye and alone with a throwing circle and a cage and the wind and the ravens and my dreams of throwing better in competition and I am satisfied. Getting into the zone at practice is very possible and replicating this at a meet has to be the ultimate experience for an athlete.

Is there a place for teaching stories? Like the following!

I walked into a high school gym with my street clothes ( I was to change there) as I had been asked by a teacher to come for practice (indoors) Kids can't take an old man seriously when he is smaller and shorter than they are. (5'8" and 175lbs) and looks as old or older than their grand parents. I walked in and saw a big boy obviously palming a 12 lb shot in a way he could really hurt himself. I watched him throw a few then approached and without introductions I suggested he hold it slightly differently. He looked at me as if I had come from the moon. He looked me in the eyes and expecting me to be like his coach, a non-thrower teaching the throwers, he asked me." Have you ever thrown this?" "A few times" I said. He gives me the shot and says :"Show me"
I had street shoes on and the wall was about 35 feet away.(He hadn't even come close to it when he threw). I took it, did a standing throw and hit the wall about 4 feet off the ground. He looks at the wall, looks at me, looks at the wall and looks at me and says: "How did you say I have to hold the shot?"

Coaching has to be the best form of practice if you can throw with them, or jump with them or run with them, but you have to pick your battles because they will want to test you. And that's all right because I tell them I am coaching them to beat me but I am going to practice with them and I hate being beaten by a young person so don't expect it to be easy.

Thanks for the chance to share.

J.P. Mayer (Canada)



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Mon Jul 16, 2007 8:13 am

 
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Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 10:57 am
Posts: 121
Location: Huntsville, AL

M30 about to be M35. I train and coach College kids. I don't hit the same times as they do but I give them a run for there money. Sometimes I even beat a few of them. :shock: That really gets me going and it motivates them also. What 19 year old wants to get beat by a 35 year old man. Pride is a funny thing!

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Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:35 am

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Junior Masters Athlete
Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:29 am
Posts: 4

As a master: distance and mid-distance female

3 days a week of Yoga

Mileage is only slightly lower, one day off every 2 weeks.

More cross training to meet cardio minimums

No more indoor track! more recovery running in winter

Less intense interval work, more aerobic based training

More core strength than ever before and it shows - I never had this physical strength in the 20's or 30's



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Mon Aug 25, 2008 5:40 pm

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Posts: 4
Location: HILLSBORO, KANSAS

This is my first post; hopefully not my last. My wife and I are multi-event athletes who trained throughout this past year to get ready to represent the U.S. at the USA-Great Britain multi-event challenge (and national championships). The meet was held in June in Joplin, Mo.

Our training this past year contained several elements. I wanted to add a few thoughts about some cross-over training that we found successful. And, I wanted to add a word of caution about a disastrous training decision that I made that knocked me out of the national meet.

One thing that helped my wife and I tremendously over the winter months (we live in Hillsboro, Kansas) was committing ourselves to do the P90-X workouts (Tony Horton) -- One hour a day, six days a week, for 90 days.

They are the most grueling workouts we've ever done, post-college (my wife and I ran track at the University of Kansas). But the workout format is scalable and adaptable, and that made it perfect for us (we train together).

http://www.beachbody.com/product/fitnes ... ARSEA_P90X

P90-X involves lots of bodyweight lifting, push ups, pull ups, sit ups, lunges, etc., and forced us to work areas we wouldn't normally work, head to toe. The workouts were fast paced and so there was lots of built-in cardio.

As a result, our fitness was outstanding when the weather got good enough for us to start training outside. (No, we're not getting paid for this endorsement, but we would happily wear P90-X shirts if they sent them to us.) With my agility, flexibility, strength and endurance vastly improved, I was eager to start the spring workouts with an eye on nationals.

The most difficult thing about training for the decathlon is figuring out what event to work on, how much to run, how much to jump, how much to throw, how much to rest, etc.

I had to be very careful in this area because I was so excited about being in a new age group (50-54) with lighter implements, which are tailor made for a decathlete! I can snap my wrist with a 6K shot! And the 1.5 discus really flies! (The 16-pound shot, and the 2-K discus were a load even in my college decathlon days.)

As the meet drew near, my fitness level sharpened and I was feeling great about all the events. But in the excitement, I lost my common sense.

The lower hurdles had allowed me to make great gains. Claire, who hurdled in college, had re-constructed my form and I was really getting over them nicely, so two weeks before nationals, I decided to go all-out over a flight of five hurdles -- Not once, not twice, not thrice, but four times!

On the last "one more time" I was pushing off to attack the first hurdle when my already-tweaky hamstring "exploded" in a pull-cramp.

I was down -- and out of the nationals. There was just no way was I going to be able to compete with a hamstring pull on the same leg I throw and jump from, and there wasn't enough time to heal.

The great thing about being injured at nationals was being able to photograph all of the great competitors (including my wife, who represented the U.S. very well in the heptathlon against Great Britain, in the 50-54 age group. As the only U.S. competitor at nationals, it's hard to say She won the nationals! but she did perform well and achieved all-American standards in three events.)

The other great thing about being at the national meet was asking the best multi-event athletes from the U.S. and Great Britain the same question this forum is asking: How do you train?

What I learned is that every one of the athletes there had had to overcome some sort of tweak, pull, glitch at some time during their training, or had learned to compensate for some sort of nagging, lingering whatever.

Tweaky injuries have got to be the worst! How do you know if you're really injured or just hurt? How do you know when to rest, or when it's OK to train? One thing we agreed on, as big meets get closer, one has to weigh all the risks in pushing on through, not just for the competition at hand, but for the competitions you'd like to be part of, years from now.

When sharing my tale of woe with my peers, they nodded their sympathies. To a man, their message was: "The mantra of successful training in masters track and field isn't, 'Let me do one MORE; it's Let me be content to do one LESS."

No easy task when one is obsessed with the decathlon. But as we get older, being able to know "when to say when" is the gift that keeps on giving us more days to enjoy God's gift of good health, good friends, and good fun.

I've made a good comeback from my hamstring injury. I took the time off needed, rehabbed smartly, and was pain-free at an all-comers masters meet in Halstead, Kansas on Saturday. I threw the 6k shot 40 feet, 1 inch, and the discus 132 feet, both are masters PRs for me, and would have won the events at the national decathlon.

I'm excited about the Senior Olympics next month, and what the next year will bring in the multi-event meets.

About masters track and field, I've still got more questions than Carter's Got Pills: how to train for the jumps and sprints without injury; how to make a 600 javelin fly (it's like throwing a toothpick!); and the like.

I've also enjoyed reading the posts that include a mystical or spiritual element to what we're fortunate to be doing at our age. For me, the training itself is a journey of heart, soul, mind, and strength.

The competition is a celebration, like icing on the cake, especially when things "click" like they did this weekend.

I hope I didn't wear out my welcome by posting a novel for my first post.

I look forward to learning from all of you.

God's Best,

Grant Overstake
Hillsboro, Kansas



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Wed Dec 24, 2008 10:25 am

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Senior Masters Athlete
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 4:39 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Wyoming,MN

Well? Due to injury I basically took a year off last year. So, that being said I just recently started over again from the ground up. I have acquired some home gym equipment so I created a workout regimen based on what I used to do and what I have the equipment to do now to get the same results (or close). Not only that but I put a video series together and posted on my myspace site for anyone who would like to use it. The address is www.myspace.com/mikesoulewyomingmn . Most of what is on the video is pole vault specific but it's a great start for those just coming out of the box. The videos are in three segment based upon the three areas of focus and what I will do each day. I have already decided that I might tweak the routine by separating the two upper days (like I have in the videos) with my legs day. Best thing that I have found about this is that I have shorter workouts on more days. Believe it or not my "day after" body aches are at a minimum. I'm sure it is because I'm working pretty much every day and not allowing for the body to tighten up. This is "day 1" comeback training. I hope you can use it to your benefit...............Later.......Mike



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