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Sat Jan 17, 2009 5:23 am

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Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 7:21 pm
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Location: NW Oregon

I know all the objections to using music for training, but I have started using it to help me increase my stride frequency.
I read Jack Daniels book and he mentions that the running stride rate should be around 180 steps per minute, while beginner joggers usually start around 160 steps per minute.
I counted mine and I was doing a lot of my easy runs at 160 steps per minute.
I tried to listen to regular music on my mp3 player, but the beats per minute seem to vary in the songs.
I looked on line and found two sites who offer mp3 music especially designed for training.

MP3 Running
and
run2rhythm

I have downloaded the 45 minute instrumental tract from mp3 running, and have run with it for a few weeks now.
It is set at 170 beats per minute and goes for for several minutes and then gives you a break and goes back into the music.
I also used audacity to speed it up to 180 beats per minute, and that seems very fast to me.
I was able to run a 6 mile run somewhat easily to the 170 bpm song, but struggled at running at the 180 bpm song, but I know that it I keep it up, it will get easier.
I did two 1,000 meter intervals the other day, the first one running to the 170 beats per minute tract, and the second one at the 180 bpm.
I ran a 3:46 on the first, did a 200 meter walk rest, and then ran a 3:40 on the second. I just focused on having a normal fluid stride while matching my stride to the beat of the music, I didn't not try to run these any faster than I normally would, but just focusing on the stride rate.

Since I tend to train alone, I think that this will be a help to my training, and focusing on pacing.(
I liked just the instrumental songs from mp3 running, the tracts with the coaching seemed kind of dumb to me, but maybe for a beginning jogger, it might help)

I am wondering what the rest of you think of this approach, and have any of you tried it before?



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Sat Jan 17, 2009 9:56 am

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Master Masters Athlete
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Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 6:11 am
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Location: Massachusetts

thanks for the suggestions for "tunes", I have been using podrunner downloads at the gym while warming up on the bike. The faster the beat, the faster my pace.
I have not used music while running - I think it is dangerous to do so while running outside on the road- others may disagree. But I will try it on the track and see how it works. Most of the music on my ipod is classical - not exactly susitable for running but podrunner might work - it comes in a variety of bpm week to week - and I will try your suggested sources too.



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Sat Jan 17, 2009 4:06 pm

 
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Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 4:39 pm
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Location: Wyoming,MN

It makes a lot of sense.....that is if you can count to 4 (that's an inside music statement). I've got a little background in music and recording and what you'll find in most "pop" music is that it is recorded at 120 beats per minute. Obviously if you take one of those tunes and kick it up to 180 beats per minute it's going to sound dumb. If you find a tune that you like, with your program maybe slow it down to 90 BPM for your 180 or 80 BPM for you 160. Then hopefully you'll be able to run it "doubletime". If you hear a song enough when you're training and have a little mental musical aptitude, when you compete you mentally play that song in you head as you run. As a pole vaulter, I have always used those mental rhythms when I run and jump. I try to coach it too. Funny thing is, is that when I competed I basically "straight poled". Now with a pole that bends I find myself coming out of the jump too early because of the many years, long ago, of timing that straight pole and those "rhythms in my head". The obvious caution with your plan is "DON'T STICK ANYTHING IN YOUR EARS IF YOU'RE ANYWHERE CLOSE TO TRAFFIC". As the old CB'ers used to say "we want to talk AT you and not ABOUT you". Good luck, it sound like a decent plan to me. Later.................Mike



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Sat Jan 17, 2009 5:11 pm

 
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Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 7:21 pm
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Location: NW Oregon

The one pop song I like for the beat is Bob Seger's "The fire inside".
I think it is set to about 170 bpm and holds the drum beat for most of the song, until it picks it up for the last few seconds, perfect for a kick at the end of a race. The whole song is a little over 5 minutes, perfect for those repeat miles (or close enough for me).
I did speed it up to 180 and it didn't make Bob sound like a chipmunk.



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Sun Jan 18, 2009 9:20 am

 
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Senior Masters Athlete
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 4:39 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Wyoming,MN

Yep! you're right, 170 BPM. (I just timed it out on my stuff here in the studio). Good choice. I can see how speeding it up won't wreck it. Now, if you can memorize the tune and the tempo, take it to the track. I really believe if you can do that you can use it as a "pacer". Nice concept. Later.....................Mike

P.S. Listen to that Bob Seager song enough at 180 BPM so that when you hear it at regular time it will sound slow to you. Believe me, If you listen to it enough at 180 your brain will teach itself to accept that tempo.......(barring once again if you can count to 4....HE HE).



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