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Fri Mar 26, 2010 3:36 pm

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Joined: Fri Mar 26, 2010 3:22 pm
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I'm 66 and thinking of participating in the 800 meter run at the NY Senior Games in June. I haven't run track since high school but stay fit through biking. I want to begin training for the 800 meters but all the guidelines I see online are geared to much younger competitors and seem too complicated. I just want some basic guidelines for different training methods that would hopefully be age appropriate. Can anyone give me suggestions or guidance where to find such info? Larry



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Fri Apr 02, 2010 8:19 am

 
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Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 9:11 am
Posts: 73
Location: Maine

I'm surprised you haven't gotten replies yet. I think everyone's burned out after Kamloops and Boston. This is exactly what I faced when I decided to become a sprinter at age 50. There's lots of training advice out there if you are 18 or an Olympian - not so much if you're a master. But the good news is... the database is growing. There are MANY good 800 runners in the 50, 60's and up. I don't have specific advice for you since it's not my event but I hope you'll get some advice.



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Fri Apr 02, 2010 11:45 am

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Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2009 7:21 pm
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Location: Fresno CA

:) Hi KimW,

I'm not sure how many people replied, but I e-mail him last week about my Genesis Sub 2 program. I guess he has the advice he needs! You said that there are many good 800 meter runners in the 50's, 60's and up, but there are also some good ones 49 and down out there! I was able to coach Horace Grant, from a (2:14.7) 800 down to a (2:07.3) in a year. I was only 42 years old when i worked with him. I have worked with master runners, since I was 21 years old. I coached Dennis Duffy when he was 43 years old, he is a 400/800 meter runner, to a 2:04 (800) and a 50.7 (400) meters.

The problem is not more advise, it's (self coaching for "most" master runners). It is the same with sprinters as well. Look for top master runners, who coach and can run faster than most runners.

Ask them to develop you a training program. While asking for advice is good my best advice is to seek a coach to help you to run faster.

runingmanjoe@aol.com :o



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Fri Apr 02, 2010 1:22 pm

 
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Junior Masters Athlete
Joined: Fri Apr 02, 2010 1:02 pm
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Location: USA

I'm an M60 800 meter runner. I recommend that you build up a base of running. Bicycling is good cross-training. I use it myself but you need to put in the running miles. To build up the kind of stamina you need to give 800 meters a good effort, I'd aim for 25-30 miles a week of running.

Of that total, I'd recommend a day of 5K interval training. 2-3 miles of different combinations of intervals. The most basic would be 4 to 8 800 meter intervals. You should run these at about 5K pace. You will also need a day on the track doing faster intervals. For these, keep the distances short and the total distance no more than 1 or 1.5 miles. Getting started you might run an 800 meter race in 4 parts. Run 200 meters at approximate 800 meter pace, rest 1-1/2 minutes and run another until you've completed 4.

Never run two hard days in a row. Your intervals should be at least two days apart.

Interval training is tricky. I recommend running at least a mile before the interval portion to warm up. Then stretch. Then I recommend running a half mile on the track cruising the turns but picking up speed on the straightaways. After this you will be sufficiently warmed up for the workout. After the workout, be sure to jog slowly for at least 1 mile to help wash out the lactic acid from your muscles.

Be sure to keep hyrdrated to avoid cramping or heat illness.


It's impossible to condense what you need to know in a blog post. I recommend you look at Earl Fee's book, "The Complete Guide to Running". It is a very good book about running and the middle distance portions are very helpful.

If you want a system of training, you may want to pick up "Speed With Endurance" by the great coach, Bill Squires and Bruce Lehane (Boston University Men's Coach). It provides a framework for self-coaching at all distances. It explains how to modify it for the kind of training you want to do - from 800 meters to the marathon.

I think you can find both of these on Amazon. I'm not sure about Squires.

I hope this is helpful. Start deliberately with your training. Plunging in with a newcomer's enthusiasm can lead to overtraining and injuries.

Steve Viegas, stephenviegas@hotmail.com

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Sat Apr 03, 2010 2:09 pm

 
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Joined: Fri Mar 26, 2010 3:22 pm
Posts: 2

Thanks to everyone who responded to my post. I'm beginning to create a training program that will work for me, and I appreciate the suggestions that were offered. I did send for Earl Fee's book and even spoke with him on the phone. He suggested an excellent website petemagill.blogspot.com that focuses on "Younger Legs for Older Runners."



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