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Sat Nov 14, 2009 6:11 pm

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Master Masters Athlete
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Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:01 pm
Posts: 250
Location: Chico, CA

COPLAND, S.T., J.S. TIPTON, and K.B. FIELDS. Evidence-based treatment of hamstring tears. Curr. Sports Med. Rep., Vol. 8,
No. 6, pp. 308-314, 2009. Hamstring tears are exceedingly common in a variety of athletic populations and contribute to a significant
amount of morbidity and time lost from sport. Many modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors have been identified with hamstring injury.
There is strong evidence that Nordic hamstring exercises can decrease the risk of hamstring injury, limited evidence that sports specific
anaerobic interval training and isokinetic strengthening can reduce injury rates, and limited evidence that daily static stretching after injury
can increase recovery rate. The majority of medical, surgical, and rehabilitative intervention studies have limitations based on the total
number of hamstring injuries included in a given study, reliance on retrospective cohort studies, and conclusions based on case series that
limit the utility of the information. Most do not provide a level of evidence greater than expert opinion.



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Sun Nov 15, 2009 11:15 am

 
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Senior Masters Athlete
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 4:07 pm
Posts: 13
Location: Napa, CA

My PT prescribed the eccentric nordics as part of my hamstring rehab and recommended adding them to my regular workout to prevent further injuries. So far (knock on wood) it's been successful.

As I understand it, the theory is that any running/lifting that we do develops the concentric contraction (pulling heel towards glute) but we do nothing what works that muscle in the opposite direction.

Here's a good way to think about it. I read somewhere that hurdlers with big feet (like me) tend to have a lot of lead leg hamstring issues. It is suggested that this may be caused by the weight of the foot swinging up to clear the hurdle. The hamstring doesn't have the strength to control the foot's upward momentum, it overstretches, and this results in an injury.

Here's a demonstration of the exercise I put on my blog:
http://tonygiov.wordpress.com/2009/09/1 ... tive-care/

_________________
Tony, Men 50-54
All-American: Jumper, Hurdler, & Multis



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Sun Nov 15, 2009 3:38 pm

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Master Masters Athlete
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Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:01 pm
Posts: 250
Location: Chico, CA

Here are a few videos I found on Youtube

1. Glute-ham raises: www.youtube.com/watch?v=FM4fcVP4hHo

2. Nordic hamstring raises with bands: www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pr1HJkowZU

3. Nordic hamstring raises: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YZL0LDZmVg



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Sun Nov 15, 2009 3:59 pm

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Master Masters Athlete
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Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:01 pm
Posts: 250
Location: Chico, CA

Someone was kind enough to send me this video:

http://www.tartan.nl/oef/oef.asp?oef=9



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