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Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:39 am

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Journeyman Masters Athlete
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 8:15 am
Posts: 30
Location: Harvard University

I've had an on-again, off-again battle with iliopsoas tendinitis. These are muscle attachments in the anterior (front) hip region. It's sometimes localized in the hip protrusions, but sometimes is a band across that area.

It's been a frustrating experience: when I get some good speed training in, this begins to kick in and I have to back off.

I *think* I've identified the culprit: training in spikes too much. I can see the wisdom of training in spikes to get used to them - no doubt, but I think that training too much of them can leave you vulnerable to more injuries.

In my particular case, I think that ordinary flats "give" just a little when my foot contacts the track, but the immediate "grip" of spikes causes a mini-jolt that my body has to absorb. The creates the problems in the core region.

I know some guys - 800/mile runners who never wear spikes because they feel it's too much of a danger. I've found that I get my flair-ups when I wear spikes too often in practice.

Any experience or thoughts about training in spikes?

Thx!

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Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:39 am

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Master Masters Athlete
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Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 6:11 am
Posts: 83
Location: Massachusetts

I never train wearing spikes. For track training I usually wear a pair of spikeless x-c shoes - but twice a week at the most,and only for the spped part of my workout. I dislike training on the track wearing my road running shoes - they are bigger, heavier, and I have a tendency to trip over my own feet wearing them, however I wear them to warm up and cool down.
That being said - if you are training on the Harvard U indoor track - that is pretty close to training on cement. That track seems to get harder each year (maybe it is me but others say the same thing). No way would I train wearing spikes on that. I am looking for a lightweight but more supportive pair of training shoes to use at Harvard where I train once a week.
btw - got the same sort of hip problem - and training on the indoor track is not making it feel better.



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Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:42 pm

 
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Master Masters Athlete
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Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 7:21 pm
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Location: NW Oregon

I don't wear spikes in my workouts.
I have light weight trainers (Asics DS trainers Weight: 10.2 oz (size 9)) which I use for longer intervals, and cross country racing flats (Nike Air Zoom Streak XC 2 Weight: 5.4 oz (size 9)) which I use for my shorter speed intervals.
Even the cross country racing flats are a little risky for me to train in since they very close to a spike last. I will probably race my 800 - 1500 in those cross country flats, and use my spikes if I race the 400 meters.

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Wed Jan 20, 2010 4:50 pm

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Senior Masters Athlete
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2006 7:28 am
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I rarely train in them - mainly just to get used to them prior to racing. I train in Nike Frees (no socks)



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Thu Jan 21, 2010 8:27 am

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Journeyman Masters Athlete
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 8:15 am
Posts: 30
Location: Harvard University

Thanks! Yup, I work out on the Harvard indoor track. Well, that might explain it - plus I got my flare up of iliopsoas tendinitis running the 800 on it (in spikes).

When do you work out? Maybe we've seen each other?

I also have a membership at Reggie Lewis, but it's a royal pain to get over there, and the hours are tough b/c of all the high school meets.

Anyway, once I get over this bout, it'll be no training in spikes from now on, just the XC flats. Live and learn...

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Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:39 pm

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Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 6:11 am
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Location: Massachusetts

I train at Harvard on Tuesday nights with Liberty AC - and since my x-c spikeless shoes are not doing it for me on that track - today I bought a pair of Nike Free - will see how those feel next Tuesday night. My problem with training on the indoor track in most running shoes - I tend to trip over my feet - do not do that in x-c shoes - hopefully the frees will provide a bit more of a cushion but not wide enough for me to manage to trip myself.

Will be at Harvard on Sunday for the GBTC Invitational - womens' mile - no masters section for women - not enough of us sign up I guess. all the young fast women will have to lap me - "sigh" not fun sometimes getting old and slow.



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Fri Jan 22, 2010 2:19 am

 
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Journeyman Masters Athlete
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2009 12:30 am
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Location: Stockholm, Sweden

NSHSDad, Interesting. I may have your complaint. I thought it was my hip joint going. However the pain (or rather pains than move around the hip area, lower back and leg) is not persistent but intermittent. It is clearly related to intensity of training but paradoxically it is also helped by training, stretching, etc.

As you now mention the indoor track, I would guess that your condition is also caused by running fast repetitive say 200m intervals with too short rest on those tight curves of the hard indoor track. Tight curves and short rest may be the main problem. For me they seem as much a contributory factor as training in spikes. It may be good idea to avoid spikes in training, warm up on long rubber mats, do dashes on straight stretches and increase rest between each 200m/400m run.



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Fri Jan 22, 2010 1:00 pm

 
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Journeyman Masters Athlete
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 8:15 am
Posts: 30
Location: Harvard University

RunFast70 - good luck on Sunday. I'm sitting it out to let my psoas heal - it's actually recovering reasonably well. Ice baths seem to help, because they can get real deep.

Anthony - the psoas connects from near the base of the lumbar region of the spine, picks up tendon connections from the hip and extends down to the femur. The pain can seem to migrate all over the place, because there are nerves bundled in.

I saw an acupuncturist, who confirmed that my psoas muscle is swollen.

I don't know if it's the indoor turns per se - I also got it during outdoor season last year. The strongest correlation is when I workout in spikes - that's when it seems to hit the hardest. On the other hand, working out on that Harvard track does seem to bang a person about.

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